The Best And Worst MLB Stadiums To Eat A Hot Dog And Watch A Game

Baseball | 10/25/19

One thing all professional sports have in common is having stadiums that keep their fans coming back to every home game. Baseball franchises especially have to make sure their ballparks are up to par due to the extended amount of time people sit there to enjoy the games. Sadly, not every venue is modern enough to keep fans coming back. These are the stadiums that fans love and hate the most. It might make you want to catch a game or two. Or not.

Minute Maid Park – Houston Astros

houston astros
hellokitzia/Instagram
hellokitzia/Instagram

Minute Maid Parks has all the makings for an exciting park. At this location, you have a retractable roof, and a real train the runs every time the home teams cranks out a homer.

There used to be Tal’s Hill in the center, but they got rid of that because it was dangerous for outfielders. There are buildings close to the outside of the stadium too, so it’s a cozy experience that makes you feel like you’re in the heart of downtown.

Miller Park – Milwaukee Brewers

brewers (1)
prist416/Instagram
prist416/Instagram

It was all the rage to build stadiums with roofs in 2001, so that’s what they did with Miller Park. The interesting thing about it is that it always feels like the Brewers play outside, even when the roof is closed. That’s mainly due to the infrastructure set up around the stadium that helps the retractable roof.

The Brewer’s slide might be the best part of this venue. Whenever they belt a home run, Bernie Brewer cruises down the slide. Fans can take a trip down it as well.

Citizens Bank Park – Philadelphia Phillies

phillies
Drew Hallowell/Getty Images
Drew Hallowell/Getty Images

While Citizens Bank Park is a perfectly fine stadium to take in Philadelphia Phillies games, there are some improvements that could be made. For starters, the distance between the seats closest to the foul line.

One of the things the Phillies did to add a spark was bring over the 19-foot high Liberty Bell from the old Veterans Stadium. That’s the best spot for you to take any selfies. They also added an open-air beer garden along with a family-friendly pub. Grab a beer and a cheesesteak with your friends!

Nationals Park – Washington Nationals

nationals park in washington
Will Newton/Getty Images
Will Newton/Getty Images

The 2019 NLCS winners built a park ahead of its time when they added a social gathering space. Now every other venue looks to add their own space for millennials to gather around.

The stadium also pumps money into the economy as they’re responsible for the other developments near it. The immediate area is one of the fastest-growing in D.C. and it always feels like there’s construction going on behind the outfield walls, but that’s okay.

Marlins Park – Miami Marlins

Miami Marlins
Marlins_Man/Twitter
Marlins_Man/Twitter

The Marlins play in a town where there is an average of 248 sunny days and only 128 rainy ones. They made the correct choice by adopting a retractable roof, but that might be the only thing they did right.

The walls in the outfield rise so high, it takes up space, leaving little seating out there for fans. It also makes the stadium feel unbalanced or like it isn’t complete. Fly balls that go to that area always look like they travel into empty space.

Comerica Park – Detroit Tigers

Detroit Tigers
jlimbright_photography/Instagram
jlimbright_photography/Instagram

Many have mixed opinions about this ballpark. Something that delights visitors is the Tiger’s history that’s prevalent there with the monuments of some of the best to wear a Detroit jersey. Another pleasant treat is the 70-foot long bar in the Berr Hall.

On the other hand, the outfield was built with such a shallow angle that it swallows seating. When they’re winning, this park gets packed with fans who can look past its faults. When they’re not, you can buy cheap seats and move up to the expensive ones.

Kauffman Stadium – Kansas City Royals

Kansas City Royals
tdiver35/Instagram
tdiver35/Instagram

In most cases, ballparks positioned next to a freeway would receive poor reviews. Kauffman isn’t your typical stadium, thanks to the upgrades they’ve added in the past decade. It may be old, but it has some new tricks.

Kauffman Stadium has the best scoreboard in the sport, along with various nods to the city. There’s a stellar fountain right under the scoreboard because Kansas City is the City of Fountains, after all. You can have a great time here.

Petco Park – San Diego Padres

San Diego Padres
valecotah/Instagram
valecotah/Instagram

Located in the always sunny San Diego, Petco Park is one of the better ballparks in the MLB. Overall, it’s difficult to watch a bad game when you’re in San Diego, thanks to the waterfront location.

Petco Park has decks on the left and right field, but also opens up in the center area, providing sublime views of the San Diego skyline. Things get better when you realize that the corner of the brick building acts as the left-field pole too!

PNC Park – Pittsburgh Pirates

Pittsburgh Pirates
iantmorton/Instagram
iantmorton/Instagram

PNC Park where the Pirates play is a must-visit, even if you aren’t going to see a game. They purposely created the right and center field bleachers lower so people could see the views of the Pittsburgh skyline and the yellow bridge.

An underappreciated scoreboard rests in the left field that doesn’t try and take away from the beauty of the stadium. The only issue is that the Pirates have a hard time bringing in fans because of their play.

SunTrust Park – Atlanta Braves

Atlanta braves
linzdefranco/Instagram
linzdefranco/Instagram

This ballpark might not have the same scenic views as some of the others previously listed, but it does have some of the best amenities. SunTrust Park has an in-house microbrewery, allowing them to brew their own brand.

The park isn’t downtown like others, but they made it in the newly built entertainment and residential district. That leaves room for plenty of activities to take place after the game ends. The seating also provides good sightlines from all locations, so this park is substantial overall.

Coors Field – Colorado Rockies

colorado rockies
Justin Edmonds/Getty Images
Justin Edmonds/Getty Images

One of the main reasons this stadium so unique is that it represents Denver and the state of Colorado so perfectly. The construction reminds us of a frontier town.

If you happen to stay for a night game and catch the sunset, you’re gifted to a beautiful view as the sun sets over the left-field wall. There’s a nature scene in center field that’s unnatural, but it still works for Coors Field. You should give this stadium a visit if you haven’t!

Citi Field – New York Mets

new york mets
alexgiaimo/Instagram
alexgiaimo/Instagram

They aren’t the Yankees, but the Mets do have a pretty cool field. It might not be the best place for home run hitters, but the stadium itself always ranks high thanks to fans.

The atmosphere and concessions here are second to none. If anything is missing, it’s monuments of Mets’ history. They could also afford to bring back some of the old Shea Stadium features. Those are improvements that could help, but even without, Citi Field is sensational.

Progressive Field – Cleveland Indians

cleveland indians
tribehotdogs/Instagram
tribehotdogs/Instagram

Progressive Field has some awesome outfield perks that make for an exciting field to watch a game. The center and right field bleachers feature a wall that’s only nine feet high, while the left field has a “mini-monster” 19-foot wall.

For those who don’t know, this wall action turns home runs into doubles as they go off the giant wall in the left field. Outfielders can easily rob homers thanks to scaling walls on the other parts.

Oriole Park – Baltimore Orioles

Baltimore Orioles
igballparks/Instagram
igballparks/Instagram

Oriole Park at Camden Yards has everlasting charm. They built this stadium with the past heavily involved. The design includes nearby historic buildings and landmarks. Stepping foot into the stadium makes you feel like you’re time traveling.

There’s plenty of cozy seating throughout the stadium, as well. The scoreboard boosts the old school vibe you get when you’re there, so the people who put this place together knew what they wanted to achieve and succeeded.

Target Field – Minnesota Twins

minnestoa twins
taymbrown/Instagram
taymbrown/Instagram

If you wanted to go to a park that has it all, then Target Field is the one your heart desires. That’s mainly thanks to the fact that this stadium doesn’t turn a decade old until April 2020.

The city view over the right and center field walls are a bright spot. Outfield seating is also a luxury because there’s lots of it. The only thing to complain about is that the games are outside, so the beginning of the season can become frigid.

Dodger Stadium – Los Angeles Dodgers

los angeles
Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Dodger Stadium provides those who occupy the venue with a ton of benefits. You get a classic design, gorgeous landscape, and a ton of famous people. The “L” shaped canyon called Chavez Ravine provides a beautiful backdrop for the arena.

If you stay for sunset, then the mountains take on a whole new look. If you’re going to a game, be on the lookout for celebrities. Los Angeles teams tend to bring out the stars.

Oracle Park – San Francisco Giants

San Francisco Giants
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
Christian Petersen/Getty Images

One of the best things about Oracle Park is when you see all the kayakers paddling around the outfield fences trying to get moonshots in McCovey Cove. That visual alone makes this stadium one of the top tier places.

You also have a newer design mixed with nostalgia-driven features like the massive Coke bottle and glove. You’ll feel like you’re at an old park, but you’ll get to enjoy modern amenities while looking at the kayaking spectacle. That’s a sweet deal.

Busch Stadium – St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis Cardinals
sjdayley/Instagram
sjdayley/Instagram

One of the best features of Busch Stadium is the seating. If you’re sitting anywhere that faces the outfield, you will have a view fit for a God. The outfield has an opening that gives audiences all access to the St. Louis skyline and the St. Louis Arch.

You can’t get any more American than watching a game, sipping a beer and looking at views of the “Gateway to the West.” Thanks to the Cardinals being a solid team every year, the stands get packed and the atmosphere is electric.

Yankee Stadium – New York Yankees

New York Yankees
amiiii0624/Instagram
amiiii0624/Instagram

It might not be the “House that Ruth Built,” but the new Yankee Stadium is a cathedral for baseball’s most storied franchise. Visitors oftentimes become awestruck by the grandeur.

Since opening in 2009, Yankee Stadium opened many amenities like upper deck bars, an on-site butcher and charging docks for your precious electronic devices. The fan experience makes this stadium worth not having the ghosts of legends floating around. Plus, you’re seeing a top tier team in action.

Fenway Park – Boston Red Sox

Boston Red Sox
Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images
Michael Ivins/Boston Red Sox/Getty Images

The name itself holds a strong legacy. Fenway Park is essential for any baseball fan to visit. It’s the oldest park in the league, and it still latches on to those old charms. Fenway has a hand-operated scoreboard in the outfield, one of the last few to still have one.

Outside of the scoreboard, Fenway offers some unique seating options. If you wish, you could sit 37 feet in the air, giving you quite the view.