’90s NBA Stars: Where They Wound Up After Their Final Game

Basketball | 3/15/21

MJ, Shaq, “The Dream Team” – there are many players and teams from the ’90s that still resonate with NBA fans today. And while people know the stats and career highs and lows of those legends, many don’t continue following players after their time in the NBA comes to an end.

From David Robinson founding a private academy to Grant Hill swapping his basketball sneakers for dress shows to commentate on NBA Inside Stuff, here’s what some ’90s basketball stars did after retirement.

Then: John Stockton

John Stockton
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

John Stockton played point guard for 19 seasons on the Utah Jazz. And while he never won a championship title, Stockton is credited with helping the team make the playoffs each year he played, not to mention bringing them all the way to the finals twice. Since then, the franchise hasn’t seen the championship finals stage.

Even without a ring, Stockton is still wildly considered to be one of the greatest point guards to come out of the NBA. Part of the 1992 “Dream Team,” Stockton was also named a ten-time NBA All-Star and a nine-time NBA Assists Leader. His number, 12, was ultimately retired by the Jazz.

Now: John Stockton

John Stockton
Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis
Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for The Buoniconti Fund To Cure Paralysis

After retiring from the NBA in 2003, John Stockton traded the professional court’s grad stage for something a bit smaller. He began coaching youth teams in his hometown of Spokane, Washington, taking on around seven to eight teams at any given time.

In 2013, he published his first book, an autobiography titled Assisted. In 2015, he moved up to the collegiate coaching level, taking the job as the Montana State University women’s basketball team’s assistant coach.

Then: David Robinson

Then: David Robinson
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

Former center for the San Antonio Spurs, David Robinson, aka “The Admiral,” made quite a name for himself while in the NBA. A ten-time NBA All-Star, Robinson is known for being part of both of the ’90s “Dream Teams,” alongside the likes of Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, Larry Bird, and Charles Barkley.

Wildly considered to be one of the greatest centers to ever step on the court, Robinson was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame twice. Once for both his individual achievements and the second as a member of the 1992 Olympic Men’s Basketball Team.

Now: David Robinson

Now: David Robinson
Earl Gibson III/Getty Images
Earl Gibson III/Getty Images

After retiring from the game in 2003, David Robinson went on to pursue other ventures. In 2001, he founded a school called the Carver Academy, a nonprofit private institution that caters to providing opportunities to inner-city kids. A few years later, in 2012, the school’s name changed to IDEA Carver and became a charter school.

Although he is still very active with the school, Robinson is also known as a philanthropist, donating around 10% of all business venture profits to charity.

Then: Muggsy Bogues

Muggsy Bogues
Todd Warshaw /Allsport
Todd Warshaw /Allsport

Even though he’s known for being the shortest player to ever grace the professional basketball court, at five foot three inches, Muggsy Bogues didn’t let his height stop him from playing in the NBA for 13 seasons. While he was on a few different teams, Bogues is arguably best known for his time on the Charlotte Hornets.

While there, Bogues helped elevate the team, even helping them make it to the playoffs during three seasons. We wound up retiring in 1999 before moving on to play for the Toronto Raptors.

Now: Muggsy Bogues

Muggsy Bogues
Jeff Hahne/Getty Images for Kenny Smith
Jeff Hahne/Getty Images for Kenny Smith

After retiring from both the NBA and Canadian basketball, Muggsy Bogues took some time away from the game. He hopped into the real estate business until 2005 when he was asked to take up the head coaching position of the WNBA team, the Charlotte Sting.

Then, in 2011, he became the head coach for the high school boys basketball team at United Faith Christian Academy. Most recently, Bogues was inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 2020.

Then: Gary Payton

Gary Payton
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

While he’s probably best known for playing point guard for 13-seasons with the Seattle SuperSonics, Gary Payton was in the NBA from 1990-2007. He obtained more than one record during that time, including SuperSonic franchise records for assists, points, and steals.

And that’s not even including the fact that he’s an NBA Champion, a two-time All-NBA First Team, and a nine-time NBA All-Defensive First Team, a record he actually happens to share with none other than Michael Jordan. With his slick defensive skills and playmaking abilities, “The Glove” is considered one of the best point guards of all time.

Now: Gary Payton

Gary Payton
Jeff Hahne/Getty Images
Jeff Hahne/Getty Images

Gary Payton has been quite busy since retiring from the NBA in 2007. A year after switching his status to “ex-player,” Payton became an analyst for NBA TV. Then, in 2013, he was named a studio analyst for Fox Sports Live. Aside from his small-screen appearances, though, Payton’s also dabbled in the silver screen.

In 2019, he voiced a lego version of himself in the animated picture The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part. He’s also made appearances on Onion SportsDome and The Jamie Foxx Show.

Then: Michael Jordan

Then: Michael Jordan
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

During the 90s, the people who didn’t know the name Michael Jordan were few and far between. One of the biggest names in the game, Jordan played a solid 15 seasons in the NBA, winning six titles during that time, each with the Chicago Bulls.

Considered one of the leading icons to popularize professional basketball in the 80s and 90s, Jordan became a cultural phenomenon during his days as a shooting guard. And as part of the 1992 “Dream Team,” a six-time NBA Finals MVP, and named the “20th century’s greatest North American athlete” by ESPN, it’s not hard to see why.

Now: Michael Jordan

Now: Michael Jordan
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Stepping off the court for good in 2003, Michael Jordan didn’t stray too far from the game. In 2006, he bought a take in the Charlotte Bobcats (Hornets) basketball franchise, gaining the title of “Managing Member of Basketball Operations.” By 2010, he owned a majority of the franchise.

Aside from basketball, Jordan was directly involved in the docuseries The Last Dance, an Emmy Award-winning feature focusing on his career in the NBA. Today, he’s enjoying life with his wife Yvette Prieto, their children, and, most recently, their grandchild, who was born in 2019.

Then: Chris Mullin

Chris Mullin
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

From 1985-2001, Chris Mullin played small forward and shooting guard for the Golden State Warriors and the Indiana Pacers. A two-time Olympic gold medalist, Mullin was part of the famous “Dream Team” during the 1992 Summer Games. But his time in the NBA amounted to much more than two medals.

During this time, Mullin became a five-time NBA All-Star, made the All-NBA First Team, a two-time All-NBA Second Team, and even had his number, 17, retired by the Golden State Warriors, a huge honor.

Now: Chris Mullin

Chris Mullin
Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images
Lachlan Cunningham/Getty Images

After leaving the game behind him in 2001, Chris Mullin didn’t stray too far. In fact, he went back to the team that gave him everything, the Golden State Warriors. Starting as a special assistant, Mullin soon found himself being offered the position of Executive Vice President of Basketball Operations.

Then, in 2013, he switched over to the Sacramento Kings, becoming an advisor for the organization. Two years later, he took a coaching position at St. John’s University, something he stuck with until 2019. Now, he can be seen on NBC Sports Bay Area, commentating on pre and post-game stats for the Golden State Warriors.

Then: Scottie Pippen

Scottie Pippen
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

Scottie Pippen, alongside teammate Michael Jordan, is credited with making professional basketball and the NBA popular. From 1987-2004, Pippen played small forward for more than one team in the league, including the Chicago Bulls, Houston Rockets, and Portland Trail Blazers.

He’s a six-time NBA Champion, eight-time NBA All-Defensive First Team, a seven-time NBA All-Star, and three-time All-NBA First Team, and was a part of the 1992 “Dream Team.” It’s no wonder Pippen is considered one of the best small forward to come out of the league.

Now: Scottie Pippen

Scottie Pippen
Kevin Mazur/Getty Images
Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Retiring from the game in 2004, it only took a few years for Scottie Pippen to be inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, once for his individual achievements on the court and a second time; as part of the 1992 Olympic “Dream Team.”

In 2010, he became a team ambassador for the Chicago Bulls. For the next few years, he moved around the franchise, becoming a senior advisor to the Bulls’ president and COO as well as working in public relations. In 2020, Pippen was dismissed from the organization when he and the powers that be couldn’t come to an agreed salary.

Then: Grant Hill

Grant Hill
Ezra O. Shaw /Allsport
Ezra O. Shaw /Allsport

Grant Hill played for four teams during his time in the NBA, including the Detroit Pistons, Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns, and the Los Angeles Clippers. Right off the bat, people could see Hill’s natural talent and he became known as one of the best all-around players on the court.

While he never won a championship ring, Hill was still named a seven-time NBA All-Star, an All-NBA First Team, a four-time All-NBA Second Team, and was even named Co-Rookie of the Year in 1995, his first season in the league.

Now: Grant Hill

Grant Hill
Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic
Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic

Retired from the NBA in 2013, Grant Hill went on to do numerous things after his professional career. The first venture being the host of NBA Inside Stuff as well as a sports broadcaster on CBS. Then, in 2015, Hill became the co-owner of the Atlant Hawks.

Hill has been married to Canadian singer Tamia since 1999. As of 2021, they’re still happily married. Currently, they live in Florida and have two daughters together, Myla Grace Hill and Lael Rose Hill.

Then: Reggie Miller

Reggie Miller
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

Reggie Miller played in the NBA from 1987-2005. Known for his three-point shooting abilities under pressure, Miller was a force to be reckoned with on the court, especially while playing the New York Knicks. He didn’t get the nickname “Knick Killer” for nothing!

During his time in the league, Miller went on to be named five-time NBA All-Star, a three-time All-NBA Third Team, and, by the time he retired, the Indiana Pacers already had plans to retire his number, 31. Fun fact: the UCLA Bruins also retired his number!

Now: Reggie Miller

Reggie Miller
Johnny Nunez/Getty Images for Stance
Johnny Nunez/Getty Images for Stance

After retiring from the NBA in 2006, Reggie Miller became an NBA analyst on TNT. But his stint on the small screen didn’t stop there. Miller also served as a guest host on Live with Regis and Kelly and became a weekly contributor on the ESPN Radio show The Dan Patrick Show.

Miller also went on to the silver screen, appearing in the comedy sports film Uncle Drew. Most recently, in 2020, he became part of the board of directors for USA Cycling.

Then: Shaquille O’Neal

Shaquille O'Neal
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images
Sporting News via Getty Images via Getty Images

For 19 seasons, Shaquille O’Neal played on six teams across the NBA and became known as one of the greatest players of all time. Drafted into the league in 1992, Shaq went on to win NBA Rookie of the Year and was named to the NBA All-Rookie First Team.

It was the start to what would be a ridiculous career, including four championship titles, being named a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a 15-time NBA All-Star, an eight-time All-NBA First Team, as well as having his number 34 retired by the Los Angeles Lakers and his number 32 retired by the Miami Heat.

Now: Shaquille O’Neal

Shaquille O'Neal
Michael Reaves/Getty Images
Michael Reaves/Getty Images

After his time in the NBA, Shaquille O’Neal went on to pursue many different, odd, and out-there ventures. From mixed martial arts and professional wrestling to acting and becoming the face of more than one brand, Shaq has been all over advertisements and the television screen, including Papa John’s Pizza.

Most recently, in 2020, Shaq appeared in the Netflix film Hubie Halloween. Then in 2021, he appeared on an episode of AEW Dynamite, teaming up with Jade Cargill in the ring to defeat Red Velvet and Cody Rhodes.