The Biggest College Football Stadiums

Football | 1/11/22

College football is big business. For athletes, it’s the necessary step they must take to reach the NFL. For students and alumni, it’s a chance to cheer on their team alongside a massive gathering of fans. With so much interest in the game, college stadiums can get fairly oversized, with the biggest reaching a capacity of over 100,000 fans. And which stadium is that? You’ll have to read on to find out!

Raymond James Stadium – University Of South Florida – 65,587 Capacity

Outback Bowl at raymond james stadium
J. Meric/Getty Images
J. Meric/Getty Images

Known on Sundays as being the home of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Raymond James Stadium also houses the University of South Florida on Saturdays. The NFL stadium is a luxury for the college team and reaches a capacity of just over 65,000.

The program is still building a fan base, and having such spacious digs should help as head coach Jeff Scott builds the team up.

Lane Stadium – Virginia Tech – 66,233 Capacity

lane stadium in virginia
Michael Shroyer/Getty Images
Michael Shroyer/Getty Images

Located in Blacksburg, Virginia, Lane Stadium is the home of the Virginia Tech Cavaliers. The first game played here happened in 1965 when the stadium wasn’t quite as big.

Several renovations and expansions throughout the years have seen Lane Stadium hit a capacity of over 66,000. That’s a lot of fans in the stands!

Lincoln Financial Field – Temple University – 68,532 Capacity

Central Florida v Temple at lincoln financial field
Mitchell Leff/Getty Images
Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

Looks like the Philadelphia Eagles aren’t alone playing at Lincoln Financial Field. The 68,000 seat stadium becomes a college football mecca on Saturdays when Temple University takes the field.

Throughout the school’s history, ten players have cleated up and found their way to the NFL and Pro Bowl selections, most notably Joe Klecko. Unfortunately for Klecko, he played at Temple before the Lincoln Financial Field era.

Gillette Stadium – University Of Massachusetts – 68,756 Capacity

a view of gillette stadium
Larry French/NCAA Photos via Getty Images
Larry French/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

Another NFL stadium that gives way to a college team on Saturdays, Gillette Stadium is the perfect place for the University of Massachusetts to call home.

Gillette opened in 2002 and is noticeable for having one end of the stadium be open-air, allowing for the backdrop of New England to be seen by not just the 68,000 fans at the game, but also the players on the field.

Husky Stadium – University Of Washington – 70,138 Capacity

Oregon v Washington at husky stadium
Steph Chambers/Getty Images
Steph Chambers/Getty Images

One of the oldest college football stadiums, Husky Stadium was built in 1920 for the University of Washington. In 2011, it underwent a major renovation, upping its overall capacity to over 70,000.

Before that renovation, the stadium was showcased by the NFL in several exhibition games between 1955 and 1975.

Kinnick Stadium – University Of Iowa – 70,585 Capacity

iowa football and kinnick stadium
Keith Gillett/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Keith Gillett/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Opened in 1929, Kinnick Stadium has gone through two major renovations that have expanded its capacity to over 70,000. The home of the Iowa Hawkeyes, Saturdays are a true spectacle as one of the best programs in the nation takes the field.

One of the biggest joys fans get at Kinnick Stadium is watching head coach Kirk Ferentz lead the team. He’s been the man calling the shots on the sideline since 1999.

Memorial Stadium – University Of Missouri – 71,004 Capacity

North Texas at Missouri memorial stadium
Scott Winters/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Scott Winters/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Known by the locals as Faurot Field, Memorial Stadium is the Saturday home of the University of Missouri. The field was given its special name in 1972 after legendary coach Don Faurot.

Memorial Stadium is the third-largest sports stadium in Missouri and was first opened in 1926, five years after fundraising efforts began.

Legion Field – University Of Alabama-Birmingham – 71,594 Capacity

SOCCER at legion field
Michael Wade/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Michael Wade/Icon Sportswire/Corbis/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Originally opened in 1921 with only 21,000 seats, Legion Field, also known as “the Old Gray Lady” now holds over 70,000. Full of history, the field has hosted much more than just college football games.

In 1996, Olympic soccer matches were held at Legion Field. Music festivals are also frequently held at the spacious location.

Razorback Stadium – University Of Arkansas – 72,000 Capacity

razorback stadium in arkansas
Wesley Hitt/Getty Images
Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

In 2001, Razorback Stadium added “Donald W. Reynolds” to its moniker in honor of the American philanthropist and businessman. Opened in 1938, it has long served as the home stadium for the University of Arkansas’ football program.

Before opening the stadium, the Razorbacks played at a tiny home field that could only accommodate a few hundred fans.

Spartan Stadium – Michigan State – 75,005 Capacity

spartan stadium in michigan
Adam Ruff/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Adam Ruff/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Capable of expanding to hold over 80,000 fans, “The Woodshed,” maxes its traditional capacity at just around 75,000. The Michigan State Spartans have called Spartan Stadium their home since 1923.

Initially opened with a small capacity of 14,000 seats, increased demand and modernization have called for several expansions, bringing Spartan Stadium to its massive size today.

Notre Dame Stadium – University Of Notre Dame – 77,622 Capacity

notre dame stadium
Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

The ground was first broken on Notre Dame Stadium in 1929, and since then the field has borne witness to college football history. The long-standing home of the fighting Irish, the once humble-sized stadium now can hold over 77,000 fans.

More than just a football field, Notre Dame stadium also hosts concerts, soccer games, rugby matches, and the Ivy League school’s commencement ceremony.

Williams-Brice Stadium – University Of South Carolina – 80,250 Capacity

Alabama v South Carolina at williams brice stadium
Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images
Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Located on campus at the University of South Carolina, Williams-Brice Stadium has been in action on Saturdays since 1934. Fans of the program are rabid, and regularly fill up the 80,000 person stadium to standing room only.

In the ’70s, the stadium was nicknamed “The Cock Pit” by fundraising groups looking to raise money to install an AstroTurf playing surface.

Camp Randall Stadium – University Of Wisconsin – 80,321 Capacity

camp randall stadium in wisconsin
Dan Sanger/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Dan Sanger/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Over 100 years old, Camp Randall Stadium has been standing since it first opened in 1895. The home of the University of Wisconsin Badgers, more than a few great NFL players got their start here.

With an official capacity today of just over 80,000, the stadium has shown the ability to hold nearly 83,000 fans when the game is big enough.

Memorial Stadium – Clemson University – 81,500 Capacity

South Carolina State v Clemson at memorial stadium
Jacob Kupferman/Getty Images
Jacob Kupferman/Getty Images

A long-standing college stadium, Memorial Stadium in South Carolina is so revered, that when the Carolina Panthers entered the NFL in 1995, they played their first season here.

Since the ’40s, Clemson University has played here. Originally a 20,000 seat stadium, it now holds over 81,000 strong and is the largest stadium in the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Doak Campbell Stadium – Florida State University – 82,300 Capacity

doak campbell stadium
Ken McKimm /Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images
Ken McKimm /Icon SMI/Icon Sport Media via Getty Images

Named after former FSU President Doak Campbell, and built for $250,000 ($2.69 million in 2020), Doak Campbell Stadium is a living monument. As the stadium capacity has grown, so too has the history it honors.

In 2004, Bobby Bowden had his name added to the stadium’s moniker, officially making it Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium.

Memorial Stadium – Oklahoma University – 84,000 Capacity

West Virginia v Oklahoma at memorial stadium
Brett Deering/Getty Images
Brett Deering/Getty Images

Also known as the Palace on the Prairie, Memorial Stadium in Norman, Oklahoma opened in 1923. In 2019, it underwent a major renovation that increased its seating capacity to well over 80,000.

Despite opening in 1923, the stadium didn’t actually have permanent seating until two years later, in 1925, when 16,000 seats were installed.

Jordan-Hare Stadium – Auburn University – 87,451 Capacity

Tennessee v Auburn at jordan hare stadium
Michael Chang/Getty Images
Michael Chang/Getty Images

Located in Auburn, Alabama, Jordan-Hare Stadium holds nearly 90,000 roaring Auburn University fans every Saturday. Hosting its first game in 1939, there aren’t many better places to take in a college football game.

The original capacity of the stadium is unknown. Some rumors persist that it first opened with only 7,500 seats, but other more inclusive figures claim it was double that.

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium – University Of Florida – 88,548 Capacity

Tennessee v Florida at ben hill griffin stadium
James Gilbert/Getty Images
James Gilbert/Getty Images

Opened in 1930 with a capacity of 21,000, Ben Hill Griffin Stadium has expanded quite a bit over the years. The first expansion came in the ’50s when the capacity was doubled.

In 1991, another expansion took place to increase the stadium to 83,000 seats. Then, in 2003, another 5,000 seats were added.

Rose Bowl – UCLA – 89,702 Capacity

rose bowl in pasadena california
Rose Bowl Stadium/Facebook
Rose Bowl Stadium/Facebook

One of the most historic stadiums in the nation, the Rose Bowl is located in Pasadena, California, and has been the home of the UCLA Bruins since 1982. The team previously played at the Coliseum but felt a need to move with the Oakland Raiders coming to town.

The Rose Bowl has a listed attendance capacity of just under 90,000 but has recorded crowds of over 100,000 before.

Memorial Stadium – University Of Nebraska – 92,000 Capacity

Wisconsin v Nebraska at memorial stadium
Steven Branscombe/Getty Images
Steven Branscombe/Getty Images

“The Sea of Red” is always brightest on Saturdays when the University of Nebraska Cornhuskers suit up and run onto the field at Memorial Stadium. Built for $450,000 in 1923, the stadium originally had 31,000 seats.

Prior to opening, the Cornhuskers played at Nebraska Field. They won their first game at their new home by a score of 24-0.

Sanford Stadium – University Of Georgia – 92,746 Capacity

Georgia Tech v Georgia at stadium
Scott Cunningham/Getty Images
Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

The first stadium on our list to officially top 90,000 seats is Sanford Stadium, the home of the Georgia Bulldogs. It is also the 10th largest stadium in the NCAA, because… college football.

Sanford Stadium first opened in 1929 with 30,000 seats and has gone through several notable expansions. The most notable recent one came in 2003 when seating was increased from 86,000 to 92,000.

Los Angeles Coliseum – USC – 93,607 Capacity

LA Coliseum view
Dustin Snipes/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Dustin Snipes/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

First commissioned as a memorial to World War I veterans in Los Angeles, the Coliseum has become a monument of college football pride in the hundred years since.

The same year it opened, USC played its first football game there against Pomona College. About a decade after opening, the Coliseum hosted the Summer Olympics (1932) for the first time.

Darrell Royal Stadium – University Of Texas – 100,119 Capacity

Louisiana Monroe v Texas at darrell royal stadium
Brian Bahr/Getty Images
Brian Bahr/Getty Images

The University of Texas Longhorns have been nearly impossible to beat at their home. Darrell Royal Stadium opened in 1924 and has seen the school go 375-117-10 there.

All that winning has been good for the university. Originally built with 27,000 seats, the stadium now holds more than 100,000 screaming fans.

Tiger Stadium – LSU – 100,500 Capacity

lsu at tiger stadium
Stephen Lew/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Stephen Lew/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Considered one of the loudest stadiums in college football, Tiger Stadium has gone through multiple expansions since opening in 1931.

You can imagine how loud the stadium can get with more than 100,000 fans in attendance. Even before that number was so high, coaches had a hard time. Alabama legend Bear Bryant even once remarked, “Baton Rouge happens to be the worst place in the world for a visiting team. It’s like being inside a drum.”

Bryant-Denny Stadium – University Of Alabama – 101,821 Capacity

Tennessee v Alabama at bryant denny stadium
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

First named Denny Stadium when it was opened in 1929, Bryant was added in the ’70s to honor coach Bear Bryant. Under his watch, the University of Alabama football program started on a path to become the most decorated program in college history.

With that kind of success, it only makes sense that the stadium can hold over 100,000 fans.

Neyland Stadium – University Of Tennessee – 102,521 Capacity

Florida v Tennessee at neyland stadium
Donald Page/Getty Images
Donald Page/Getty Images

On September 18, 2004, 109,000 fans packed into Neyland Stadium to watch the Tennessee Volunteers take on Florida. It was the most fans Neyland Stadium has ever hosted, and roughly 7,000 over its stated capacity.

The initial cost of construction on Neyland Stadium was $42,000, which in today’s terms would inflate to around $525,000.

Kyle Field – Texas A&M University – 102,733 Capacity

Mississippi State v Texas A&M at kyle field
Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images
Thomas B. Shea/Getty Images

Kyle Field, with a capacity of over 102,000, is the largest college football stadium in the Southeastern Conference (SEC). It is home to Texas A&M and was first opened in 1904.

With all the expansions and renovations, Kyle Field looks like it was built in the last 10 years, not over 100 years ago.

Ohio Stadium – Ohio State University – 104,944 Capacity

Purdue v Ohio State at ohio stadium
Emilee Chinn/Getty Images
Emilee Chinn/Getty Images

Another longstanding stadium that has seen attendance capacity explode over the years is Ohio Stadium, the home of the Ohio State Buckeyes. Unlike other stadiums, however, this one started out pretty large.

When it opened in 1922, Ohio Stadium could hold over 66,000 fans. Today, that number is just under 105,000.

Beaver Stadium – Penn State University – 106,672 Capacity

Michigan v Penn State at beaver stadium
Scott Taetsch/Getty Images
Scott Taetsch/Getty Images

Named after former Governor of Pennsylvania James A. Beaver, Beaver Stadium has served as the home of Penn State football since 1960. At that time, it could hold just over 46,000 fans.

Today, Beaver Stadium has a stated capacity of 106,672. When the stadium is fully “whited out,” on Saturdays, it is one of the hardest places for opposing schools to play.

Michigan Stadium – University Of Michigan – 107,601 Capacity

Michigan v Iowa at michigan stadium
Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Nicknamed “The Big House,” Michigan Stadium is the largest college football stadium in the United States by capacity. The behemoth can hold over 107,000 strong and regularly fills up every Saturday.

Built in 1927 with a capacity of over 70,000, Michigan Stadium has always been big, which is needed. Since 1975, the school has seen attendance hit over 100,000 for more than 300 straight games.